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Washington State University National Center for Transportation Infrastructure Durability & Life-Extension (TriDurLE)

IACIP Best Poster Awards

Ph.D. students Hanli Wu and Anyou Zhu from the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at Missouri S&T, received the First Place and Second Place IACIP Best Poster Awards, respectively, during the International Association of Chinese Infrastructure Professionals (IACIP) Student Poster Contest at the 12th Annual IACIP Workshop (Virtual) on January 9th and 16th, 2022. Hanli Wu’s topic was “Impacts of lightweight aggregates ACEs on thermal performance in Alaska permafrost regions,” and Anyou Zhu’s topic was “Feasibility Study on Foamed Fire-Resistant Coating Materials”. Their advisors are Drs. Jenny Liu and Xiong Zhang.

Haifang Wen Named ASCE Fellow

Congratulations to Dr. Haifang Wen of Washington State University, who has been named a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). The ASCE represents more than 150,000 members of the civil engineering profession in 177 countries and is the nation’s oldest engineering society.

Yan Zhang wins CUTC award

Yan Zhang, a WSU Ph.D. student in Civil & Environmental Engineering, has won the 2022 Council of University Transportation Centers (CUTC) Milton Pikarsky Memorial Award for the best Doctoral dissertation. The annual CUTC National Annual Student Awards recognize outstanding scholarship in transportation research and education. All awards come with an honorarium and award winners were recognized at the CUTC Annual Awards Ceremony, held in virtually on Saturday, January 8, 2022. Congratulations Yan!

Webinar: Modeling collapsible soil and its impact on axially loaded piles

Speaker:  Mohamad Ashour, Ph.D., Alabama A&M University
Associate Professor and Coordinator of Civil Engineering program
Department of Mechanical and Civil Engineering

Title: Modeling collapsible soil and its impact on axially loaded piles

Time: January 26, 12:00 PM Pacific Time

view the recording of this webinar

 

Forterra Resilience & Sustainability Webinar

Presentation

Sustainability is key to building a brighter future for our families and our communities. What we do today affects tomorrow. This presentation covers the three pillars of sustainability, and provides principles of resilience to support our efforts to build a sustainable infrastructure. In terms of environmental sustainability, this means being conscious of our world and the environment we live in. For economic sustainability it means looking beyond this year’s budget and evaluating true cost of ownership. For societal sustainability, it means limiting delays and improving social convenience while keeping user safety a top priority. Lastly, an integral part of sustainability is ensuring that our infrastructure is resilient enough to resist and defend our communities from present and future threats. Coming from the drainage world, the presenter will offer comparisons and case studies based on storm drainage products on the market today. This presentation is based on researched performed by a task group composed of member companies of the American Concrete Pipe Association, of which Joseph Updike co-led.

About the Speaker

Joseph Updike (EIT) is a Technical Resource Engineer with Forterra, the largest precast concrete pipe manufacturer in North America. Joseph specializes in providing lunch and learns, resources, and support for DOTs, municipalities, and consultants. Additionally, this role includes speaking at universities to allow up and coming engineers a glimpse of the drainage industry, and how critical it is to our infrastructure. In his short career, Joseph has served as a co-chair for an ACPA task group on Resilience & Sustainability, and has spoken at ACPA’s Pipe School in 2020. He has served on multiple ASCE committees including the Infrastructure Resilience Division, Committee for Cold-Regions Engineering, and is currently the vice president of the Black Hills ASCE Chapter. Joseph is a December 2019 graduate of the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology where he earned his B.S. in Civil Engineering. Outside of work, Joseph dedicates time to his wife, family, and church community in the Blacks Hills of South Dakota, but has also found time to explore his interests in novel and poetry writing. In 2020, Joseph won first prize in a national poetry contest, and looks forward to many other opportunities. Looking to the future, Joseph hopes to earn his PE license in Structural Engineering, and continue exploring ways to improve the world around him through engineering.

Poro-Elastic modeling and measurement of rebar corrosion and crack formation using high frequency ultrasonics

Webinar title: Poro-Elastic modeling and measurement of rebar corrosion and crack formation using high frequency ultrasonics

Speaker: Pierre-Philippe Beaujean, Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University

Pierre-Philippe Beaujean is a Professor at the Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering, at Florida Atlantic University. He specializes in the field of underwater acoustics, acoustics in sediments and porous solids, signal processing, sonar design, data analysis, machine health monitoring, and vibrations control. Dr. Beaujean is an active member of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), and of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE).

Licensing deal aims to enable safer winter roads with more sustainable chemicals

An anti-icing technology developed at Washington State University is being licensed by Fusione Corp., a Massachusetts-based snow and ice operations company, with the goal of creating environmentally responsible and sustainable snow and ice road treatments. Read More

Webinar: Evaluating Sidewalk Infrastructure & Prioritizing Investment

Webinar Title

EVALUATING SIDEWALK INFRASTRUCTURE & PRIORITIZING INVESTMENT

Speaker(s)

Wes Marshall with Nick Coppola, University of Colorado Denver

Webinar Abstract

This project leverages advances in technology and increasing access to high-resolution remote sensing and spatial data to develop methods for inventorying sidewalk characteristics and static obstructions across an entire major city. In part 1 of this effort, we analyze city-scale sidewalk availability, width, and land coverage calculated from spatial data from aerial imagery (planimetrics). We then determine how much of a difference accounting for static obstructions makes when measuring the clear width of sidewalks in one city. Part 2 then combines planimetric sidewalk data with vehicle and pedestrian trip big data to develop a methodology to prioritize city areas in need of pedestrian infrastructure attention.

The results show an overall deficiency of sidewalks and indicate that deriving sidewalk availability, average width, and minimum clear width are feasible at the city scale. Moreover, the results suggest a significant decrease in the average clear width of sidewalks when accounting for static obstructions. Not accounting for static obstructions could lead to a gross overestimation of seemingly adequate sidewalks and an unrealistic assessment of sidewalk infrastructure and pedestrian accessibility. We then present a feasible and efficient method to prioritize pedestrian infrastructure in a city.

Primarily due to a lack of data, academic literature has scant research on sidewalks. In this project, we leveraged advances in remote sensing to bridge the data and research gap on pedestrian infrastructure in cities. These results will help cities that are lacking information rectify an unprecedented backlog of deteriorating pedestrian infrastructure.

About the Speaker

Wes Marshall is a Professor of Civil Engineering and affiliate faculty in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Colorado Denver, director of the CU Denver Transportation Research Center, and co-director of the Active Communities/Transportation (ACT) research group. He is a Professional Engineer and focuses on transportation teaching and research dedicated to creating a more sustainable and resilient built environment, particularly in terms of road safety, active transportation, and transit. Other related teaching and research topics include street networks, parking, health, travel behavior, and scofflaw bicycling.  His recent book, Elements of Access, provides planners with the fundamentals of transportation engineering and engineers with the fundamentals of transportation planning. Having spent time in the private sector with Sasaki Associates and Clough, Harbour and Associates, Wes has been working on all this for the last two decades. A native of  Massachusetts, he is a graduate of the University of Virginia, the University of Connecticut, a recipient of the Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship, the Endeavour Fellowship, winner of the Wootan Award for Outstanding TRB Paper in the field of Policy and Organization, and winner of the Campus-wide University of Colorado Denver Outstanding Faculty in Research Award.

Jialuo He, Ph.D., receives the Outstanding Dissertation Award

The WSU Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering recently selected Jialuo He as the recipient of John Roberson Outstanding Dissertation Award. The title of his PhD dissertation is, “Development, Characterization and Modeling of Self-Healing Cementitious Materials.” Self-healing technology holds great promise in benefiting the durability and resilience of concrete infrastructure. While various external self-healing systems can improve the post-cracking recovery of mechanical properties of cementitious materials, few studies have explored their implications on concrete durability. Dr. He’s research responds to this critical gap by developing and investigating two external self-healing systems.

Dr. He’s dissertation demonstrates the great potential of self-healing technology in enabling concrete infrastructure with extended service life, which serves the interest of this nation. For instance, his study revealed that the self-healing system consisting of urea-formaldehyde microcapsules (containing calcium nitrite as the healant) and PVA microfibers could effectively reduce about 20-25% of the total shrinkage, 15-20% of the chloride migration coefficient, and 40-65% of the gas permeability of cementitious composite. Such a self-healing concrete could survive over 700 rapid freeze-thaw cycles, whereas the regular concrete counterpart could barely survive 60 cycles.

Jialuo He began his PhD program at Washington State University in August 2015. He has published nine academic papers in top-tier, peer-reviewed journals. In addition to his PhD research, Jialuo completed a two-year project that evaluated the performance of discrete sacrificial anodes in protecting steel rebar in salt-contaminated concrete, for which he was awarded the Simpson Strong-Tie Corrosion Research Scholarship. He also received the Richard Perteet Graduate Fellowship in Civil Engineering in 2017 and 2018. Congratulations Dr. He!